Posts Tagged ‘Programming Languages’

Project Euler, MIT Mystery Hunt Edition

The MIT Mystery Hunt starts this Friday at noon, and I’ll be participating seriously for about my 10th year. In the hunt, teams solve a collection of puzzles to discover the location of a gold coin hidden somewhere on campus. The puzzles may be numerous (sometimes over 100), are generally provided without instructions (except when [...]

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kdb+ now available for free download

If you’ve talked to me about programming languages and Wall Street in the last 4 years, I’ve probably mentioned kx. This is a company which makes a combination programming environment and database based on a language called q which is derived from APL. (Yes, APL, the language invented in 1957 before there was a [...]

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OOPSLA 2007: New Ideas, Good Quotes, and Cynical Self-Satisfaction

I’m still in Montreal, and still thinking about a lot of what I saw and learned at OOSPLA. But I wanted to jot down some links while the cool things were still fresh in my mind. So here is a short set of links worth following that I picked up while at OOPSLA.

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OOPSLA 2007: “The Popularity Cycle of Graphical Tools, UML, and Libraries of Associations” – not the workshop I expected

Today was my first day at OOPSLA 2007 in Montreal. After a brief exposure to the amazing “Underground City” (really a shopping mall that is infecting downtown like a cancer), I crashed a workshop for which I had not signed up, and had a completely different experience than I had planned at The Popularity [...]

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Transactional Memory Not Solution To All Problems

I was at MIT today and so I ended up going to an invited talk on computer architecture, Subtle Semantics and Unrestricted Implementation of Transactional Memory. Transactional Memory is a very hot topic in systems and architecture. It is perceived to be a better model for programmers, so language designers like it. And there are [...]

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